My Blog

Posts for: April, 2020

By Rick K. Harrison, DMD, PA
April 22, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
JanetJacksonEvenpopstarsgetinsecureabouttheirsmiles

Multi-platinum recording artist Janet Jackson has long been known for her dazzling smile. And yet, Jackson admitted to InStyle Magazine that her trademark smile was once a major source of insecurity. The entertainer said, “To me, I looked like the Joker!” It was only after age 30 that the pop icon came to accept her unique look.

Jackson is not alone. A study commissioned by the American Association of Orthodontists found that more than one third of U.S. adults are dissatisfied with their smile. But there’s good news—modern dentistry can correct many flaws that can keep you from loving your smile, whether you’re unhappy with the color, size, or shape of your teeth. Here are some popular treatments:

Professional teeth whitening: Sometimes a professional teeth whitening will give you the boost you need. In-office whitening can dramatically brighten your smile in just one visit.

Tooth-colored fillings: If you have silver-colored fillings on teeth that show when you smile, consider replacing them with unnoticeable tooth-colored fillings.

Dental bonding: If you have chipped, cracked, or misshapen teeth, cosmetic bonding may be the fix you’re looking for. In this procedure, tooth colored material is applied to the tooth’s surface, sculpted into the desired shape, hardened with a special light, and polished for a smooth finish.

Porcelain veneers: Dental veneers provide a natural-looking, long-lasting solution to many dental problems. These very thin shells fit over your teeth, essentially replacing your tooth enamel to give you the smile you desire.

Replacement teeth: Is a missing tooth affecting your self-confidence? There are several options for replacing missing teeth, from a removable partial denture to a traditional fixed bridge to a state-of-the-art implant-supported replacement tooth. Removable partial dentures are an inexpensive way to replace one or more missing teeth, but they are less stable than non-removable options. Dental bridges, as the name implies, span the gap where a tooth is missing by attaching an artificial tooth to the teeth on either side of the space. In this procedure, the teeth on both sides of the gap must be filed down in order to support the bridgework. Dental implants, considered the gold standard in tooth replacement technology, anchor long-lasting, lifelike replacements that function like natural teeth.

After coming to embrace her smile, Jackson asserted, “Beautiful comes in all shapes, sizes, and colors." If you don’t feel that your smile expresses the beauty you have inside, call our office to schedule a consultation. It’s possible to love your smile. We can help.

For more information, read Dear Doctor magazine article “How Your Dentist Can Help You Look Younger.”


By Rick K. Harrison, DMD, PA
April 12, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum recession  
4ThingsYouCanDotoAvoidDamageFromGumRecession

Gum recession is a serious oral condition in which the gums shrink back or “recede” from their normal position around the teeth. Because they're the primary protection for teeth below the enamel, this can expose the teeth to infection or cause painful sensitivity. And receded gums most certainly can diminish your smile.

But there are preventive measures you can adopt that might help you avoid this unpleasant condition. Here are 4 things you can do to minimize your risk for gum recession.

Practice daily oral hygiene. The main cause for recession is gum disease, a bacterial infection that weakens gum attachment to teeth. Gum disease usually arises from dental plaque, a thin bacterial film that builds up on teeth. Removing it every day with brushing and flossing minimizes the risk of gum disease and gum recession.

But don't overdo it. Although brushing is key to keeping your mouth healthy, too hard and too often can damage your gums and lead to recession. A little “elbow grease” may be appropriate for other cleaning tasks, but not your teeth—use gentle strokes and let the mild abrasives in your toothpaste do the main removal work. And avoid brushing more than twice a day.

See your dentist regularly. Your personal care efforts are a major part of preventing gum recession, but you can greatly increase the effect with professional dental care. That's because with even the best hygiene practice infections and other gum problems can still arise. You may also have inherited thinner gum tissues from your parents that increase your disease risk and bear closer monitoring.

Act quickly at the first signs of disease. Gum disease is a progressive disease, and it doesn't take long for it to become intrenched. The sooner it can be treated, the less likely you'll experience recession. So, make a dental appointment as soon as possible if you notice your gums are swollen, red or painful, or if they bleed easily after brushing.

There are ways to reverse gum recession. But many treatments like grafting surgery to regenerate new gum tissues can be quite involved and expensive. Following these tips can help you avoid gum recession altogether or stop it before it goes that far.

If you would like more information on how to avoid gum recession, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gum Recession: Getting Long in the Tooth.”


By Rick K. Harrison, DMD, PA
April 08, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  

Isn’t it time you felt more confident in your smile?

Do you feel embarrassed about your smile? Our Jacksonville Beach, FL, cosmetic dentist Rick K. Harrison, DMD, PA understands the importance of having a beautiful smile, which is why our team offers everything from veneers to implants to help you get your smile back on track.

Minor Cosmetic Procedures

If you are looking to make smaller adjustments to your smile then you probably don’t need a cosmetic treatment designed to make serious alterations. There are several ways in which our dental team can fix even minor problems to improve the overall shape and color your smile. These quick, non-invasive treatments include,

  • Dental bonding: By applying a tooth-colored resin to a tooth, we can easily cover small discolorations, gaps between teeth and chips. If a tooth is a little misshapen and you want it to look like the rest of your teeth, then bonding may be the simplest approach.
  • Teeth and gum reshaping; If you have a tooth that is just a bit too pointy or gums that seem to take over your smile then reshaping or recontouring may be right for you. We can remove trace amounts of enamel to reshape teeth while also removing excess gum tissue to reveal a more even smile.
  • Teeth whitening: Want to get a visibly whiter smile in just a single dental visit? If so, then professional chairside teeth whitening will help you get the whiter teeth you want in less than one hour. It’s a great option for someone who wants a beautiful smile before a special occasion or big event.

Getting a Smile Makeover

If you have issues that affect your smile as a whole, then the treatments above may be able to address one or two of the issues but not all of them. In this case, you may be more likely to benefit from these cosmetic treatments,

  • Dental veneers: Want a smile that wows? If so, our Jacksonville Beach, FL, dentist can place dental veneers, which can completely reshape, resize, whiter and realign your smile just by placing these thin porcelain shells over the front of your teeth. Veneers can be placed on teeth that are visible when you smile, helping you to achieve a brand-new look.
  • Invisalign: If you want to fix your crooked smile without the whole world knowing, this completely clear, nearly invisible system can help you straighten your smile quickly and efficiently. It’s great for teens and adults.

 

Are you interested in getting dental veneers? If so, Jax Beach Cosmetic & Family Dentistry in Jacksonville Beach, FL, can help you determine whether this is the ideal treatment for you. Call us today at (904) 241-4237.


By Rick K. Harrison, DMD, PA
April 02, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tooth pain  
WhyandHowtoSaveaDiseasedTooth

Let's say you have a diseased tooth you think might be on its last leg. It might be possible to save it, perhaps with a significant investment of time and money. On the other hand, you could have it replaced with a life-like dental implant.

That seems like a no-brainer, especially since implants are as close as we have to natural teeth. But you might want to take a second look at salvaging your tooth—as wonderful as implants are, they can't beat the real thing.

Our teeth, gums and jaws form an intricate oral system: Each part supports the others for optimum function and health. Rescuing a troubled tooth could be the best way to preserve that function, and replacing it, even with a dental implant, a less satisfying option.

How we save it will depend on what's threatening it, like advanced tooth decay. Caused by bacterial acid that creates a cavity in enamel and underlying dentin, decay can quickly spread into the tooth's pulp and root canals, and eventually threaten the supporting bone.

We may be able to stop decay and save the tooth with a root canal treatment. During this procedure, we remove diseased tissue from the pulp and root canals through a drilled access hole, and then fill the empty spaces. We then seal the access and later crown the tooth to protect it against future infection.

A second common threat is periodontal (gum) disease. Bacteria in dental plaque infect the outer gums and, like tooth decay, the infection quickly spreads deeper into the root and bone. The disease weakens gum attachments to affected teeth, hastening their demise.

To treat gum disease, we manually remove built-up plaque and tartar (hardened plaque). This deprives the infecting bacteria of their primary food source and “starves” the infection. Depending on the disease's advancement, this might take several cleaning sessions and possible gum surgery to access deep pockets of infection around the root.

Because both of these treatment modalities can be quite in-depth, we'll need to assess the survivability of the tooth. The tooth could be too far gone and not worth the effort and expense to save it. If there is a reasonable chance, though, a rescue attempt for your troubled tooth might be the right option.

If you would like more information on whether to save or replace a tooth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Save a Tooth or Get an Implant?